iowa

Iowa

Audit Laws

Audit Laws

State Summary

Iowa conducts audits after each general election for the race of president or governor. The state commissioner shall determine the number of counties and precincts to be audited and shall select the precincts to be audited by lot. The results of the audit are not binding and shall not change or invalidate certification.

Unless otherwise specified, statutory references are to, Iowa Code Title 2 Chapter 43 Section 50.51.

Voting Systems Used

As of 2020, Iowa primarily uses hand marked paper ballots and optical scanners in polling places statewide, with ballot marking devices for accessibility. For the most up to date information please visit Verified Voting’s Verifier.

For an explanation on the types of voting equipment used, click here.

Audit Comprehensiveness

Iowa audit law indicates that “the absentee ballot and special voters precinct for each county shall be included with all other precincts of the county for selection by lot.” There is no specific mention of provisional ballots.

Transparency

Iowa’s audit law states that “a representative selected by each of the two political parties whose candidates received the highest number of votes statewide…shall be invited to observe the hand count.” It is implied in Iowa Administrative Code 721.26.106 that the audit is open to the public, as a part of the canvass. However, there is no statutory guidance on observer participation including and up to validating ballot marks.

Audit Counting Method

Audit is conducted manually.

Type Of Audit Units

Iowa uses precincts as audit units. Number of counties and precincts to be audited are determined by the state commissioner and selected by lot.

Contests & Issues Audited

Iowa audit law calls for an audit only of the top race on the ballot, i.e. President or Governor (Iowa elects its Governor in mid-term years).

Addressing Discrepancies

Statute provides no explicit response to discrepancies found during the audit. However, an administrative recount may be conducted when the commissioner suspects that voting equipment used in the election malfunctioned or that programming errors may have affected the outcome of the election, or if the precinct election officials report counting errors to the commissioner after the conclusion of the canvass of votes in the precinct. See, Iowa Code Title 2 Section 50.50.

For recount laws, see, Citizens for Election Integrity Minnesota website.

Timeline

A post-election audit shall be completed not later than 12:00 noon three days after the county canvass of votes. See, Iowa Administrative Code 721-26.202.

Binding On Official Outcomes

Iowa audit law specifically indicates that “results of an audit conducted shall not change the results, or invalidate the certification, of an election.”

Oversight & Conduct

The audit is conducted by the Secretary of State, with the cooperation of county auditors.

Ballot Protection

The precinct-level election officials seal the ballots in an envelope and deliver them to the state election commissioner (Secretary of State), who must preserve them for six (6) months after the election. Ballots from elections for federal offices shall be preserved for twenty-two (22) months. For all voting equipment, the following security measures are required: serial number, inventory, custody and memory card log. For more information see, Iowa Code § 50.12. and Iowa Admin. Code 721-22.51.

Additional Targeted Samples

The statute does not provide for targeted samples as part of the audit. However, an administrative recount may be conducted when the commissioner suspects that voting equipment used in the election malfunctioned or that programming errors may have affected the outcome of the election, or if the precinct election officials report counting errors to the commissioner after the conclusion of the canvass of votes in the precinct. See, Iowa Code Title 2 Section 50.50.

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