Statement On Ballot Marking Devices And Risk Limiting Audits

This statement is intended to clarify Verified Voting’s position regarding the use of ballot-marking devices (BMDs) in elections, and the use of risk-limiting audits (RLAs). It is approved by the President, Board of Directors, and Staff of Verified Voting. Ballot-marking devices Verified Voting believes that voters should vote on paper ballots, but we recognize an…

Why Voters Should Mark Ballots by Hand

Author: Andrew Appel Because voting machines contain computers that can be hacked to make them cheat, “Elections should be conducted with human-readable paper ballots. These may be marked by hand or by machine (using a ballot-marking device); they may be counted by hand or by machine (using an optical scanner). Recounts and audits should be…

An Unverifiability Principle for Voting Machines

Author: Andrew Appel This article was originally posted at Freedom to Tinker on October 22, 2018. In my last three articles I described the ES&S ExpressVote, the Dominion ImageCast Evolution, and the Dominion ImageCast X (in its DRE+VVPAT configuration). There’s something they all have in common: they all violate a certain principle of voter verifiability.…

Design flaw in Dominion ImageCast Evolution Voting Machine

Author: Andrew Appel This article was originally posted at Freedom to Tinker on October 16, 2018. The Dominion ImageCast Evolution looks like a pretty good voting machine, but it has a serious design flaw: after you mark your ballot, after you review your ballot, the voting machine can print more votes on it!. Fortunately, this…

The Myth of “Secure” Blockchain Voting

Author: David Jefferson Click here to download a PDF version of this blog In the last couple of years several startup companies have begun to promote Internet voting systems, this time with a new twist – using a blockchain as the container for voted ballots transmitted from voters’ private devices. Blockchains are a relatively new…

Our Voting System Is Hackable by Foreign Powers

Author: David Dill This article appeared originally in the March 2017 issue of Scientific American. The FBI, NSA and CIA all agree that the Russian government tried to influence the 2016 presidential election by hacking candidates and political parties and leaking the documents they gathered. That’s disturbing. But they could have done even worse. It…